The Kingmaker

The Kingmaker

August 18, 2015 / Gilad Atzmon

By Gilad Atzmon

Paul Eisen, until a week ago anonymous as far as most Brits were concerned, is now a kingmaker. The UK Jewish Lobby is convinced, for some reason, that the nature of Eisen’s relationship with Labour’s leading candidate Jeremy Corbyn will determine the future of this country.

As we witness the most important political debate in Britain for generations being hijacked by the Zionist media and ‘Jewish sensitivities’, the time is ripe to ask: who is Paul Eisen?

Eisen has been described by the Jewish press and its acolytes as an ‘anti Semite’ and a ‘holocaust denier’, but peculiarly, no one mentions that Eisen is actually a Jew who sometimes even speaks ‘as a Jew’.

Eisen’s ‘crime’ seems obvious – he doesn’t adhere to the Zionist orthodox Shoah narrative. But Eisen doesn’t dispute the fact that German National Socialism despised the Jewish race, he doesn’t dispute the mass deportation of Jews, he doesn’t condone German National Socialist racism against Jews and others. Eisen doesn’t dispute the fact that many Jews died under the Nazi regime in some horrid and unfortunate circumstances. However, Eisen is sceptical on issues to do with the homicidal nature of the Nazi operation. He is not convinced that the Germans used gas chambers as a death factory.

Eisen could be right or wrong (as he himself admits in his writing), but does such a belief mount to ‘anti Semitism,’ racism or ‘hate crime’? Can the questioning of the past be considered a hateful act under any circumstances?

It’s quite the opposite: the ability to revisit and revise the past is the kernel of ethical, humanist and universal thinking. It is the attempt to grasp ‘what really happened’ which helps us to form the prospect of a better future.

Eisen calls himself a ‘holocaust denier’ but did anyone within the (free) British press care to perform the minimal journalist duty and investigate what Eisen means by his ‘denial’? The answer is no.

Eisen is obviously an opponent of the Holocaust industry, Holocaust religion and Holocaust exploitation. Eisen was tormented (as a Jew) to find out that the Israeli Holocaust museum Yad Vashem was erected on the lands of Ayn Karim, a ethnically cleansed Palestinian village. Eisen was tortured when he realised that Yad Vashem was built in proximity to Deir Yassin, a Palestinian village that was erased along with its inhabitants in a colossal cold-blooded massacre by Jewish paramilitaries in 1948.

Just three years after the liberation of Auschwitz, the newly born Jewish state wiped out a civilization in Palestine in the name of a racist Jewish nationalist ideology. It is this vile cynicism that turned Eisen into a denier – a denier of the primacy of Jewish suffering. In his eyes, if the Jews could commit the massacre in Deir Yassin after Auschwitz, the holocaust must be denied because it failed to mature into a universal ethical message.

Again, you may agree with Eisen or you may not, but his humanist and critical approach qualifies him to be the Labour kingmaker. We can only thank British Jews and their forceful media to position Paul Eisen exactly where he belongs.