‘Queen will be in hellfire’: Details emerge on samurai sword-wielding Buckingham Palace attacker

‘Queen will be in hellfire’: Details emerge on samurai sword-wielding Buckingham Palace attacker

'Queen will be in hellfire’: Details emerge on samurai sword-wielding Buckingham Palace attacker
An ISIS-supporting Uber driver wrote a suicide letter which stated that “The Queen & her soldiers will all be in hellfire,” before attacking police with a samurai sword outside Buckingham Palace this summer, a court has heard.

The terrorist suspect, Mohiussunnath Chowdhury, 27, drove a blue Toyota Prius through traffic cones towards a police van, before getting out of the vehicle, armed with his sword shouting “Allahu Akbar” and engaging in a scuffle with two officers outside the Queen’s residence. He was subsequently sprayed with CS gas and arrested, jurors were told.

ALSO ON RT.COMMI5 admit they were ‘too slow’ in tracking Manchester bomberProsecutor Timothy Cray told the jury at the Old Bailey in central London that Chowdhury planned to die as a martyr, fighting in the name of Allah.

In his ‘suicide note’ which he left on his sister’s laptop on the night of the attack in August 2017, Chowdhury wrote: “Tell everyone I love them and that they should struggle against the enemies of Allah with their lives and their property.

‘The Queen and her soldiers will all be in hellfire. They go to war with Muslims around the world and kill them without any mercy. They are the enemies Allah tells us to fight.”

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The court was told how Chowdhury had driven with a coal black samurai sword and a knife sharpener from his home in Luton, to a street opposite Buckingham Palace, before his altercation with the police.

While in custody for the attack, the terror suspect drew ‘posters’ in jail of a police officer being shot by a man shouting ‘Allahu Akbar.’

Chowdhury also sketched a picture of a plane going into the Twin Towers in New York, the Old Bailey was told. He then pinned the posters up on his cell wall after he was remanded in custody.

Chowdhury was born in London in May 1991 and later moved to Luton, working as a self-employed Uber driver. He accepts he drove his car to the palace and then brandished a samurai sword on August 25, 2017.

The trial continues.

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