Man with life-threatening blood clots and open leg ulcers loses benefits after job centre labels him fit for work

Local MP says the assessment system ‘a shambles’

PUBLISHED: 15:42, 30 April 2012 | UPDATED: 15:42, 30 April 2012

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2137377/Man-suffering-blood-clots-open-ulcers-loses-benefits-job-centre-labels-fit-work.html

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A man who is suffering from horrendous blood clots and open ulcers has lost his disability benefits – after job centre doctors labelled him fit for work.

James Major, 33, struggles to walk, and has been told by specialists at two hospitals he would be risking his life if he went back to work.

But the fisherman has had his benefits stopped after the job centre in Grimsby, decided he should go back to work – despite the huge open sores on his legs.

His MP, Austin Mitchell, has labelled the assessment system “a shambles”.

James regularly has to travel to London for specialist medical care and has been told by professors at both Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals that he is unfit for work.

He now claims he is now in a no win situation where if he returns to work he will be risking his life.

He has been brought back to land from his job at sea twice since 2010 as a result of his condition, and each time, doctors said his life was in grave danger.

James, who suffers from blood clots, has been brought back to land from his job at sea twice since 2010 as a result of his condition

The father-of-three said: ‘The ulcers on my legs started three years after I scratched myself on a cement mixer.

‘The cut got infected and I ended up with blood clots in my legs and lungs. I was in hospital and also got pneumonia and nearly died.

‘I started claiming sick benefit because I obviously couldn’t work.

After this I went for a medical at the Job Centre and failed it, but the doctor there said I was fit enough to work. At the time I could only walk with crutches.

‘I was told that I would have to claim Job Seekers Allowance (JSA).

But when I went to sign up for JSA, the staff there said I was clearly not able to work so I couldn’t claim.

‘I didn’t have a choice but to go back to sea.’

But being on his feet all the time only worsened his condition, and he went on to develop septicaemia.

After his second dash back to land, he tried to claim again, but was told the same as he was the previous time.

‘I was advised to take legal action because of the situation and we won at a tribunal.

‘I was ecstatic and we also got some money backdated.’

Although the situation was resolved for a few months, Mr Major then had to go for a routine medical review which once again deemed him fit for work.

He added: ‘But I failed the medical and I am now back at square one.

I now have to appeal again like the first time round.

‘There needs to be a change in the way the system is run because I now have the choice of either not going to work and not be able to live or go and risk dying.’

Austin Mitchell, MP for Grimsby, said the ESA assessment system is proving to be a “shambles”.

He added: ‘I would advise this gentleman to appeal the decision and to get in touch with me as soon as possible so that I can advise him.

‘A lot of appeals against ESA are being successful, which suggests there is something wrong with the assessment system.

‘The problem is that even once the ESA has been granted, people are having a long wait for the money they are entitled to.’

A spokesman from the Department for Work and Pensions, told the Grimsby Telegraph: ‘We shouldn’t automatically write off a person’s ability to work, solely on the basis of a health condition or disability.

‘That’s why the Work Capability Assessment doesn’t focus on a particular diagnosis, but on the actual abilities of an individual, and whether that person – with the right support – could undertake suitable work.

‘People who are too sick or disabled will continue to receive our unconditional support, but those who are able to work will get specialist help through the Work Programme. Customers unhappy with the decision made can appeal.’

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3 Responses to Atos kick man off sickness benefits whilst he has LIFE-THREATENING blood clots and ulcers

  1.  
    The Work Programme is workfare slavery forcing disabled to work for a third of the minimum wage. The DWP are nazis who should be put on trial for all the unlawful actions they are committing on innocent people. Most of which are disabled because of their masters poisons in the biosphere designed to reduce the population to meet the goals of the Club of Rome and their Global 2000 Report. What a wonderful Nazi society we now live in and I thought our ancestors fought against it in World War II? Maybe someone should have checked out the Deutsche Verteidigungs Dienst, Argentina, Operation Paperclip and the Ratlines out. Maybe someone should have checked who funded the Nazi’s starting in 1933 with the sum equal to the gross domestic product of the United States at the time which was one billion Federal Reserve notes by the Knight of Malta, Dulles brothers.

    -= The Unhived Mind

    CLUB OF ROME DEPOPULATION OF HUMAN BEINGS FROM EARTH [Video]
    http://theunhivedmind.com/wordpress/?p=27462

  2.  

    LARGE RESOURCE OF DATA ON THE DWP
    SLAVE LABOUR WORKFARE SCHEMES

    http://theunhivedmind.com/wordpress/?p=24583

  3.  
    Nazi Persecution of the Mentally and Physically Disabled

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/disabled.html

    FORCED STERILIZATIONS

    The “sterilization Law” explained the importance of weeding out so-called genetic defects from the total German gene pool:

    Since the National Revolution public opinion has become increasingly preoccupied with questions of demographic policy and the continuing decline in the birthrate. However, it is not only the decline in population which is a cause for serious concern but equally the increasingly evident genetic composition of our people. Whereas the hereditarily healthy families have for the most part adopted a policy of having only one or two children, countless numbers of inferiors and those suffering from hereditary conditions are reproducing unrestrainedly while their sick and asocial offspring burden the community.

    Some scientists and physicians opposed the involuntary aspect of the law while others pointed to possible flaws. But the designation of specific conditions as inherited, and the desire to eliminate such illnesses or handicaps from the population, generally reflected the scientific and medical thinking of the day in Germany and elsewhere.

    Nazi Germany was not the first or only country to sterilize people considered “abnormal.” Before Hitler, the United States led the world in forced sterilizations. Between 1907 and 1939, more than 30,000 people in twenty-nine states were sterilized, many of them unknowingly or against their will, while they were incarcerated in prisons or institutions for the mentally ill. Nearly half the operations were carried out in California. Advocates of sterilization policies in both Germany and the United States were influenced by eugenics. This sociobiological theory took Charles Darwin’s principle of natural selection and applied it to society. Eugenicists believed the human race could be improved by controlled breeding.

    Still, no nation carried sterilization as far as Hitler’s Germany. The forced sterilizations began in January 1934, and altogether an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 people were sterilized under the law. A diagnosis of “feeblemindedness” provided the grounds in the majority of cases, followed by schizophrenia and epilepsy. The usual method of sterilization was vasectomy and ligation of ovarian tubes of women. Irradiation (x-rays or radium) was used in a small number of cases. Several thousand people died as a result of the operations, women disproportionately because of the greater risks of tubal ligation.

    Most of the persons targeted by the law were patients in mental hospitals and other institutions. The majority of those sterilized were between the ages of twenty and forty, about equally divided between men and women. Most were “Aryan” Germans. The “Sterilization Law” did not target socalled racial groups, such as Jews and Gypsies, although Gypsies were sterilized as deviant “asocials,” as were some homosexuals. Also, about 500 teenagers of mixed African and German parentage (the offspring of French colonial troops stationed in the Rhineland in the early 1920s) were sterilized because of their race, by secret order, outside the provisions of the law.

    Although the “Sterilization Law” sometimes functioned arbitrarily, the semblance of legality underpinning it was important to the Nazi regime. More than 200 Hereditary Health Courts were set up across Germany and later, annexed territories. Each was made up of two physicians and one district judge. Doctors were required to register with these courts every known case of hereditary illness. Appeals courts were also established, but few decisions were ever reversed. Exemptions were sometimes given artists or other talented persons afflicted with mental illnesses. The “Sterilization Law” was followed by the Marriage Law of 1935, which required for all marriages proof that any offspring from the union would not be afflicted with a disabling hereditary disease.

    Only the Roman Catholic Church, for doctrinal reasons, opposed the sterilization program consistently; most German Protestant churches accepted and often cooperated with the policy. Popular films such as Das Erbe (“Inheritance”) helped build public support for government policies by stigmatizing the mentally ill and the handicapped and highlighting the costs of care. School mathematics books posed such questions as: “The construction of a lunatic asylum costs 6 million marks. How many houses at 15,000 marks each could have been built for that amount?”

    “EUTHANASIA” KILLINGS

    Forced sterilization in Germany was the forerunner of the systematic killing of the mentally ill and the handicapped. In October 1939, Hitler himself initiated a decree which empowered physicians to grant a “mercy death” to “patients considered incurable according to the best available human judgment of their state of health.” The intent of the socalled “euthanasia” program, however, was not to relieve the suffering of the chronically ill. The Nazi regime used the term as a euphemism: its aim was to exterminate the mentally ill and the handicapped, thus “cleansing” the “Aryan” race of persons considered genetically defective and a financial burden to society.

    The idea of killing the incurably ill was posed well before 1939. In the 1920s, debate on this issue centered on a book coauthored by Alfred Hoche, a noted psychiatrist, and Karl Binding, a prominent scholar of criminal law. They argued that economic savings justified the killing of “useless lives” (“idiots” and “congenitally crippled”). Economic deprivation during World War I provided the context for this idea. During the war, patients in asylums had ranked low on the list for rationing of food and medical supplies, and as a result, many died from starvation or disease. More generally, the war undermined the value attached to individual life and, combined with Germany’s humiliating defeat, led many nationalists to consider ways to regenerate the nation as a whole at the expense of individual rights.

    In 1935 Hitler stated privately that “in the event of war, [he] would take up the question of euthanasia and enforce it” because “such a problem would be more easily solved” during wartime. War would provide both a cover for killing and a pretext–hospital beds and medical personnel would be freed up for the war effort. The upheaval of war and the diminished value of human life during wartime would also, Hitler believed, mute expected opposition. To make the connection to the war explicit, Hitler’s decree was backdated to September 1, 1939, the day Germany invaded Poland.

    Fearful of public reaction, the Nazi regime never proposed a formal “euthanasia” law. Unlike the forced sterilizations, the killing of patients in mental asylums and other institutions was carried out in secrecy. The code name was “Operation T4,” a reference to Tiergartenstrasse 4, the address of the Berlin Chancellery offices where the program was headquartered.

    Physicians, the most highly Nazified professional group in Germany, were key to the success of “T-4,” since they organized and carried out nearly, all aspects of the operation. One of Hitler’s personal physicians, Dr. Karl Brandt, headed the program, along with Hitler’s Chancellery chief, Philip Bouhler. T-4 targeted adult patients in all government or church-run sanatoria and nursing homes. These institutions were instructed by the Interior Ministry to collect questionnaires about the state of health and capacity for work of all their patients, ostensibly as part of a statistical survey.

    The completed forms were, in turn, sent to expert assessors physicians, usually psychiatrists, who made up “review commissions.” They marked each name with a “+,” in red pencil, meaning death, or a “” in blue pencil, meaning life, or “?” for cases needing additional assessment. These medical experts rarely examined any of the patients and made their decisions from the questionnaires alone. At every step, the medical authorities involved were usually expected to quickly process large numbers of forms.

    The doomed were bused to killing centers in Germany and Austria walled-in fortresses, mostly former psychiatric hospitals, castles, and a former prison — at Hartheim, Sonnenstein, Grafeneck, Bernburg, Hadamar, and Brandenburg. In the beginning, patients were killed by lethal injection. But by 1940, Hitler, on the advice of Dr. Werner Heyde, suggested that carbon monoxide gas be used as the preferred method of killing. Experimental gassings had first been carried out at Brandenburg Prison in 1939. There, gas chambers were disguised as showers complete with fake nozzles in order to deceive victims — prototypes of the killing centers’ facilities built in occupied Poland later in the war.

    Again, following procedures that would later be instituted in the extermination camps, workers removed the corpses from the chambers, extracted gold teeth, then burned large numbers of bodies together in crematoria. Urns filled with ashes were prepared in the event the family of the deceased requested the remains. Physicians using fake names prepared death certificates falsifying the cause of death, and sent letters of condolences to relatives.

    Meticulous records discovered after the war documented 70,273 deaths by gassing at the six “euthanasia” centers between January 1940 and August 1941. (This total included up to 5,000 Jews; all Jewish mental patients were killed regardless of their ability to work or the seriousness of their illness.) A detailed report also recorded the estimated savings from the killing of institutionalized patients.

    The secrecy surrounding the T-4 program broke down quickly. Some staff members were indiscreet while drinking in local pubs after work. Despite precautions, errors were made: hairpins turned up in urns sent to relatives of male victims; the cause of death was listed as appendicitis when the patient had the appendix removed years before. The town of Hadamar school pupils called the gray transport buses “killing crates” and threatened each other with the taunt, “You’ll end up in the Hadamar ovens!” The thick smoke from the incinerator was said to be visible every day over Hadamar (where, in midsummer 1941, the staff celebrated the cremation of their 10,000th patient with beer and wine served in the crematorium).

    A handful of church leaders, notably the Bishop of Münster, Clemens August Count von Galen, local judges, and parents of victims protested the killings. One judge, Lothar Kreyssig, instituted criminal proceedings against Bouhler for murder; Kreyssig was prematurely retired. A few physicians protested. Karl Bonhöffer, a leading psychiatrist, and his son Dietrich, a Protestant minister who actively opposed the regime, urged church groups to pressure church-run institutions not to release their patients to T-4 authorities.

    In response to such pressures, Hitler ordered a halt to Operation T-4 on August 24, 1941. Gas chambers from some of the “euthanasia” killing centers were dismantled and shipped to extermination camps in occupied Poland. In late 1941 and 1942, they were rebuilt and used for the “final solution to the Jewish question.” Similarly redeployed from T-4 were future extermination camp commandants Christian Wirth, Franz Stangl, Franz Reichleitner, the doctor Irmfried Eberl, as well as about 100 others – doctors, male nurses, and clerks, who applied their skills in Treblinka, Belzec, and Sobibor.

    The “euthanasia” killings continued, however, under a different, decentralized form. Hitler’s regime continued to send to physicians and the general public the message that mental patients were “useless eaters” and life unworthy of life.” In 1941, the film Ich klage an (“I accuse”) in which a professor kills his incurably ill wife, was viewed by 18 million people. Doctors were encouraged to decide on their own who should live or die, Killing became part of hospital routine as infants, children, and adults were put to death by starvation, poisoning, and injections. Killings even continued in some of Germany’s mental asylums, such as Kaufbeuren, weeks after Allied troops had occupied surrounding areas.

    Between the middle of 1941 and the winter of 1944-45, in a program known under code “14f13,” experienced psychiatrists from the T-4 operation were sent to concentration camps to weed out prisoners too ill to work. After superficial medical screenings, designated inmates Jews, Gypsies, Russians, Poles, Germans, and others were sent to those “euthanasia” centers where gas chambers still had not been dismantled, at Bernburg and Hartheim, where they were gassed. At least 20,000 people are believed to have died under the 14f13 program.

    Outside of Germany, thousands of mental patients in the occupied territories of Poland, Russia, and East Prussia were also killed by the Einsatzgruppen squads (SS and special police units) that followed in the wake of the invading German army. Between September 29 and November 1, 1939, these units shot about 3,700 mental patients in asylums in the region of Bromberg, Poland. In December 1939 and January 1940, SS units gassed 1,558 patients from Polish asylums in specially adapted gas vans, in order to make room for military and SS barracks. Although regular army units did not officially participate in such “cleansing” actions as general policy, some instances of their involvement have been documented.

    In all, between 200,000 and 250,000 mentally and physically handicapped persons were murdered from 1939 to 1945 under the T-4 and other “euthanasia” programs. The magnitude of these crimes and the extent to which they prefigured the “Final Solution” continue to be studied. Further, in an age of genetic engineering and renewed controversy over mercy killings of the incurably ill, ethical and moral issues of concern to physicians, scientists, and lay persons alike remain vital.

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