Chinese radar data may be released by Japan

‘Japan may release data on China radar’

Sat, 09 Feb 2013 10:34:26 GMT
http://edition.presstv.ir/TextOnly/detail.aspx?id=288076

Japan says it might disclose the evidence to prove that a Chinese naval frigate directed its weapon-targeting radar on a Japanese ship in the East China Sea.

“We have evidence. The government is considering the extent of what can be disclosed,” Japan’s Kyodo news agency quoted Defence Minister Itsunori Onodera as saying on Saturday.

The Japanese defense minister further proposed establishing a military hotline between the two countries “so that we would be able to communicate swiftly when this kind of incident happens.”

On February 5, Onodera said that a Chinese frigate directed its weapon-targeting radar at a Japanese vessel in the international waters of the East China Sea on January 30.

However, on Friday, the Chinese Defense Ministry denied the allegations saying they were “against the facts.”

Beijing underlined that its ship was only using ordinary surveillance radar, and urged Tokyo to “stop stirring up tension in the East China Sea”.

“<"China hopes that Japan take effective measures to stop stirring up tension in the East China Sea and making irresponsible remarks," the Chinese Defence Ministry said in a statement." Tokyo and Beijing have long been at loggerheads over the sovereignty of a group of islands in the East China Sea, which would give the owner exclusive oil, mineral and fishing rights in the surrounding waters. The disputed islands, which are controlled by Japan and form part of Okinawa prefecture, are known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China. China presented the United Nations with a detailed explanation of its sovereignty over the disputed islands based on certain geological features in December 2012. China’s National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation announced on January 15 that Beijing was set to carry out a detailed survey of the disputed isles to “safeguard its maritime rights and interests” and to map the country’s “territorial islands and reefs.” Tensions heightened between the two countries after Japan signed a deal on September 11, 2012 to buy three of the islands from their private Japanese owner in line with plans to nationalize the archipelago. China presented the United Nations with a detailed explanation of its sovereignty over the disputed islands based on certain geological features in December 2012.

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