Gut microbes – are yours making you fat?

Gut microbes – are yours making you fat?

Friday, July 31, 2015 by: Dr. David Jockers
http://www.naturalnews.com/050605_gut_microbes_obesity_bacteroidetes.html

Did you know that your gut is interacting with bacteria every day to do more than help you digest food and that the gut is unique to every individual? Scientists have only recently become more aware of the existence of a complex network of nerves that line our stomach and gut and they are referring to it as the second brain. The makeup of your gut bacteria may be more influential on your weight and physical figure than your genetic inheritance.

A diverse number of bacteria colonize the gastrointestinal tract including the mouth, stomach and intestines. Mostly contained in the intestines, bacteria provide an arsenal of tools for the gut to interact with.

Depending on the type of bacteria available, some bacteria may serve as an ally at combating pathogens from entering into the human body while other species may be the perfect weapon of choice to make you fat.

Imbalances in gut bacteria

There are over 100 trillion microbes that live on and in the human body. Most of these microbes take cover in the gastrointestinal tract. Accounting for 98% of the gut microbiota, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes are two protective types of bacteria that are receiving the spotlight for their relationship with weight concerns. Studies have found that the higher the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (F:B Ratio), the higher the risk of obesity. (1, 2, 3)

Firmicutes

Firmicutes appear higher in concentration when an individual is consuming a high fat and high sugar diet. Researchers propose that the bacteria species categorized as Firmicutes are very efficient at harvesting energy from food.

Diets that are both high in sugar and in fat are known triggers of inflammation and can increase the permeability of the intestines (1). Chronic inflammation which results from an altered gut microbiota not only leads to obesity but may be responsible in the development of insulin resistance and inflammatory bowel diseases (2).

Bacteroidetes

Bacteroidetes have been studied in patients with Crohn’s disease to effectively reduce the state of inflammation and manage symptoms. Contrary to the effects of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes actually prevent increased fat storage. (4) Bacteroidetes help regulate the response of the body’s defensive T-cells which hunt down and destroy pathogens. (5)

Bacteroidetes produce organic acids

Organic acids are required by the body for numerous benefits. Some of these benefits include absorbing water and regulating pH in order to prevent the colonization of destructive bacteria and pathogens (4). Bacteroidetes are key players in synthesizing one major type of organic acid known as butyrate.

Butyrate is responsible for the circulation of blood flow in the intestines and for its ability to increase the availability of electrolytes for absorption (6). Along with maintaining everyday health of bowel function, butyrate is also believed to protect against the growth and spread of tumors and may prevent colorectal cancer (5).

Changing your f:b ratio

The most well-researched way to change the F:B ratio is consuming a diet high in fiber and polyphenols. Some of the best sources include:
Green and black tea
Cocoa powder and dark chocolate
Dried herbs and spices including peppermint, turmeric, cloves, oregano, rosemary, spearmint, thyme and sweet basil
Berries such as elderberry, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries
Some nuts especially hazelnuts, chestnuts, and pecans
Vegetables likes spinach, onion, broccoli and asparagus
For more information on the F:B Ratio see my complete article here: http://drjockers.com/is-your-gut-bacteria-making-you-fat/.

Sources:

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390768/

2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425142/

3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390768/

4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425030/

5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3129010/

6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070119/

Leave a Reply