Martin Luther King Murdered by US Shadow Government

Martin Luther King Murdered by US Shadow Government

July 7, 2015
http://henrymakow.com/2015/07/%20Martin%20Luther%20King%20Murdered%20by%20Shadow%20Government.html

April 4, 1968: Memphis police join Ralph Abernathy, Andrew Young and Jesse Jackson on a balcony of the Lorraine Motel. Martin Luther King, Jr. lies unconscious at their feet, felled by an assassin’s bullet. He never regained consciousness.

Martin Luther King was not killed by James Earl Ray. He was instead assassinated by the same malevolent, powerful forces that took the lives of both John and Robert Kennedy. Other civil rights leaders & media complicit in cover up.

In 1999, a trial conducted in an American courtroom that lasted thirty days and featured seventy witnesses, basically exonerated James Earl Ray, the accused lone assassin of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The general public heard little or nothing about this important event, thanks to the fact that only a few independent journalists bothered to cover it.

by Don Jeffries
(henrymakow.com)

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr., the leader of the Civil Rights movement in America, was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee.

Police would find a suspiciously convenient package dumped close to the scene of the shooting, which contained a rifle and other material that was easily traceable to long time petty criminal James Earl Ray.


(Jesse Jackson & Ralph Abernathy with MLK moments before
assassination)

The alleged suspect, however, would not be arrested until two months later, at a London airport. Ray had been traveling under an alias. Under advice from his attorney, Ray initially confessed to the killing, but recanted it three days later, and maintained his innocence until his death in 1998.

Authorities claimed that the single shot had come from the bathroom of a rooming house across the street from the Lorraine Motel, where King was staying.

There were strong indications, however, that shots had been fired from the bushes in the rear yard of the rooming house. The state’s only witness against Ray was Charles Stephens, who was so drunk at the time he couldn’t stand up. The state threw his wife, who bravely reported that Stephens had been in no shape to identify anyone that day into a mental institution.

Just one of the mysterious deaths associated with the King assassination was a cab driver who’d seen someone running from the bushes near the rooming house just after the assassination and enter a Memphis Police Department car.

Much as we saw in both Kennedy assassinations, the authorities destroyed crucial evidence in the King case. For instance, the bushes in the rear yard of the rooming house- which were very much the Grassy Knoll of this assassination- had been cut down immediately afterwards by the public works administration.

The authorities never questioned the captain of the local fire department, who had reported seeing photographers on the roof at the time of the assassination. Whatever photographs they might have taken were not introduced into the record.

KING FAMILY BELIEVED RAY WAS INNOCENT

In 1997, a civil trial conducted in an American courtroom that lasted thirty days and featured seventy witnesses, basically exonerated James Earl Ray, the accused lone assassin of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The general public heard little or nothing about this important event, thanks to the fact that only a few independent journalists bothered to cover it.

It should have been a sensational news story: Dr. King’s widow Coretta Scott King and her children Dexter, Martin Luther King III, Bernice and Yolanda, in a Shelby County, Tennessee Circuit Court sued “Lloyd Jowers and Other Unknown Co-Conspirators.”

Ray, left, was revealed to be only an unwitting patsy in the plot during the proceedings, but the silence from the mainstream media was deafening. The King family had filed suit against Jowers for wrongful death, and the civil court jury ruled in their favor, concluding that Jowers and “others, including government agencies” had conspired to assassinate King.

Memphis bar owner Lloyd Jowers, former FBI agent Donald Wilson, and James Earl Ray himself had alleged over the years that a mysterious man named Raoul, along with assorted federal agents, police and black ministers, had participated in the assassination plot. While the government investigators rejected these claims, Martin Luther King III stated, “James Earl Ray was not the triggerman and, in fact, was an unknown patsy.”

Jowers claimed to have been given a gun, and stated that the gunman had fired from behind his bar, not from the rooming house window where the government maintained Ray had fired from.

Wilson, meanwhile, had told investigators that he’d found papers in Ray’s car that referred to the enigmatic “Raoul.” Ray had long maintained that he’d carried out instructions from this never identified character.

Attorney William Pepper had worked long and hard to overturn the official narrative that James Earl Ray alone was responsible for the King assassination, which survives in spite of the 1997 court suit or any other evidence. Ray died in jail in 1998.

COMPLICITY OF BLACK ORGANIZATIONS

Just as strange was the almost complete lack of interest on the part of prominent black leaders, and organizations like the NAACP. A jury finds that the government’s version of events in the death of the foremost Civil Rights leader of the 1960s was inherently wrong, and Jesse Jackson and other black leaders have nothing to say?

Astonishingly, even the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change refrained from commenting publicly, and the link they once had about the trial on their home page has been moved to an obscure spot on their web site.

In spite of the trial, the U.S. Justice Department refused to open a new investigation into the assassination, claiming that there was not enough evidence of conspiracy.

WHY KING WAS MURDERED

By April, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. had clearly gone beyond the familiar terrain of racial politics practised by the likes of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton.

He was talking about real wealth redistribution, and had become a strong opponent of the Vietnam War.

There is no question that the Poor People’s March on Washington would have been a far more significant and memorable event had he been alive to lead it.

While Martin Luther King remains a revered figure, discussion of his death is discouraged, much as it has been with Abraham Lincoln.

We know that the FBI sent Martin Luther King a letter in late 1964, urging him in no uncertain terms to kill himself. He seemed to understand that he had a target on his back, as best illustrated in his final, stirring speech.

This 1999 trial should have been one of the biggest stories of the decade. Instead, it was ignored by an establishment press that routinely ignores substantive information.

Martin Luther King was not killed by James Earl Ray. He was instead assassinated by the same malevolent, powerful forces that took the lives of both John and Robert Kennedy.


Don Jeffries has been researching the JFK assassination since the mid-1970s, when he was a teenage volunteer for Mark Lane’s Citizens Committee of Inquiry. He is very active on all the JFK assassination forums, and has been a moderator on the London Spartacus Education Forum for several years. His first published book, the acclaimed 2007 novel The Unreals, has been compared to Alice in Wonderland and The Wizard of Oz. Hidden History is his first nonfiction book. He is the author of Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics.

Also by Don Jeffries: JFK Jr.’s Death Was No Accident
– See more at: http://henrymakow.com/2015/07/%20Martin%20Luther%20King%20Murdered%20by%20Shadow%20Government.html#sthash.GMj0RdH3.dpuf

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