Mexico captures Juarez drug cartel head

Mexico captures Juarez drug cartel head

Fri Oct 10, 2014 12:6AM GMT
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2014/10/10/381667/mexico-arrests-juarez-drug-cartel-leader/

Mexican authorities say the country’s police forces have arrested the suspected Juarez drug cartel leader, Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, in the state of Coahuila following a multi-year search for the man.

A spokesman for the national security commission, speaking on condition of anonymity, said on Thursday that Carrillo Fuentes, better known as “El Viceroy” or “The General,” was captured by federal police in the restive city of Torreon.

Mexico had offered a reward of 30 million pesos ($2.2 million) for the arrest of the 51-year-old drug lord. He also had a $5-million reward on his head from US officials.

Carrillo Fuentes took over control of the Ciudad Juarez-based drug cartel after his late brother, Amado Carrillo Fuentes, also known as “The Lord of the Skies,” died in a botched cosmetic surgery in Mexico City in 1997.

He was allegedly protected by an “extremely violent” group of former soldiers.

The Juarez cartel engaged in a multi-year turf war with interlopers from the rival Sinaloa cartel that cost more than 10,000 lives in the past eight years in the border city of Ciudad Juarez. Car bombs are by far the most lethal weapon the Juarez drug cartel uses against Mexican police.

Carrillo’s capture came just days after Mexican authorities nabbed Hector Beltran Leyva, the head of the Beltran Leyva crime family and one of the most notorious Mexican drug lords, in central Mexico.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto has pledged to get rid of gang violence that has claimed about 80,000 lives in Mexico since 2007. However, the steady stream of killings has continued unabated.

According to official data, since December 2012, an additional 1,000 people die every month in violence linked to drug cartels.

The Mexican army is still fighting drug gangs across large parts of the country. The government says it has a database of 26,000 missing people in connection with drug-related violence.

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