SCANDAL! LATEST WHO EBOLA UPDATE SHOWS EBOLA DECLINING IN WEST AFRICA: NO NEW CONFIRMED CASES IN MONROVIA LAST WEEK

SCANDAL! LATEST WHO EBOLA UPDATE SHOWS EBOLA DECLINING IN WEST AFRICA: NO NEW CONFIRMED CASES IN MONROVIA LAST WEEK

October 2, 2014

*THE MOST RECENT WHO UPDATE ADMITS CONFIRMED CASES OF EBOLA ARE DECLINING IN WEST AFRICA FOR THE THIRD WEEK IN A ROW

*NO NEW CONFIRMED CASES OF EBOLA IN MONROVIA LIBERIA LAST WEEK

*ALMOST NO CASES IN KAILAHUN AND KENEMA IN SIERRA LEONE FOR THE PAST TWO WEEKS, WHICH HAD PREVISOULY REPORTED HIGH LEVELS OF DEATHS

*EBOLA NO LONGER ACTIVE IN SEVERAL REGIONS IN GUINEA AND IN ONE REGION OF SIERRA LEONE

The figures in the latest WHO Ebola situation report published on October 1st completely contradict the official narrative being pushed by WHO, CDC and the media that Ebola is an easily transmissible and out of control disease.

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/135600/1/roadmapsitrep_1Oct2014_eng.pdf?ua=1

The WHO figures show a big drop in confirmed and probable Ebola cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in the week ending September 28th. In fact, cases of Ebola have dropped for the third week in a row.

Particularly striking has been the decline in Liberia, where Ebola cases have almost halved in the past three weeks according to Figure 1.

The situation is also better in Guinea and Sierra Leone, according to WHO.

“Reports from Guinea show a slight fall in the number of new cases reported compared with each of the past five weeks (figure 2). This fall is largely attributable to a drop in the number of new cases reported from Macenta district, which had seen a surge in the number of new cases over the past five weeks,” states the WHO update.

In Sierra Leone, WHO states there has been a drop in confirmed cases in Freetown and “very low number of new cases have been reported from Kailahun and Kenema for the past two weeks. These areas had previously reported high levels of transmission.”

The WHO report casts doubt on its own figures because a decline in Ebola cases does not fit with the official narrative.

WHO claims the true figures of Ebola confirmed cases could be under reported while suspected cases could be over reported without giving any adequate basis for this assertion.

The WHO case classification criteria of suspected cases is, however, so loose that people who have had contact with, or died of, common diseases such as cholera or malaria could be falsely classified as Ebola cases. In fact, “any sudden, unexplained death” at all even is attributed by WHO to Ebola, thereby leading to an inflation of Ebola cases.

“Table 4: Ebola case-classification criteria Classification Criteria
Suspected
Any person, alive or dead, who has (or had) sudden onset of high fever and had contact with a suspected, probable or confirmed Ebola case, or a dead or sick animal OR any person with sudden onset of high fever and at least three of the following symptoms: headache, vomiting, anorexia/ loss of appetite, diarrhoea, lethargy, stomach pain, aching muscles or joints, difficulty swallowing, breathing difficulties, or hiccup; or any person with unexplained bleeding OR any sudden, unexplained death.”

WHO also reports that two US Navy mobile laboratories have arrived in Liberia and will start operating on October 5th – so expect to see a huge increase in lab confirmed cases.

It was a Tulane University and US Navy bioweapons scientist Dr Daniel Bausch who was at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in Kenema, triggering a crackdown by the Sierra Leone government and a bar on Ebola testing by Tulane University as reported on this blog.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/08/24/uk-health-ebola-khan-insight-idUKKBN0GO09R20140824

“Two US Navy mobile laboratories have now arrived in Liberia. One team will be based in Gbarnga (Bong county), with the other based in Montserrado (the district containing the capital, Monrovia). Both teams will be operational by 5 October (figure 6). In Sierra Leone, the Chinese mobile laboratory team based in Freetown started testing samples on 29 September 2014, with a testing capacity of 20 samples per day. All other mobile laboratories in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia remain functional and are operating at full capacity.”

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